SPECS
Horsepower
240 HP
Torque
200 LB-FT
Curb Weight
2728 LB
Drivetrain
Rear Wheel Drive
Engine Size
2 L
Transmission Type
Manual
MPG (City/Highway)
22 MPG
VEHICLE STORY

In 2014 I bought this S13 with it just being a daily and a little project car, at the time I was interested in Hondas, but all of that changed when I saw my first couple of drifting videos online. I ended up buying this car while I was in Georgia for 2800. When I received it back then it had a single cam KA24, a welded diff, Raceland coilovers, and ISR (at the time ISIS) suspension arms. The fenders were already rolled and it came with stock wheels. Since then the car has been through a couple of different stages and as I learned different things the car improved. The first thing I did to it was put on some cheap replica Advans I found on e-bay. At the time I didn't know that replica wheels were a bad idea. I just wanted wheels that weren't stock on the car. From there I wanted to do a motor swap because the single cam, though was reliable, was also very slow. So I started to consider my options. The SR20 was a great option because It was drop in and easy. But the Motorsets at the time were almost $2200 and up. I found RB20 motorsets for 1400-1500 dollars at the time and I thought the straight 6 sound of an RB20 was the coolest thing ever, not to mention that they came in skylines, laurels, and cefieros. So thats what I ended up going with, at the time I thought that a 1jz swap would be too much, but to be honest I shouldve saved up that little bit more and I would've had a better motor to start with. But as I was learning, the RB20 was an amazing motor. It sounded great, made the same amount of power as an SR20 and it felt good driving with that motor in the car. So, this car is how I was able to learn and make a lot of cool friends. After the RB20 was running good and well, I decided to focus on suspension. I changed out the cheap Raceland coilovers for some PBM coils, those handled much better than what was on the car, and along with that it made the performance much better overall. Next I wanted to get a proper set of wheels on the car. So I opted for Work VSKF's. A classic 5 spoke chrome wheel that you cant go wrong with.

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Build goals?

Lately I’ve been taking a look at the scene that is immediately around me. And I ask myself if anyo

homepage tile photo for My View on Authentic vs Replica wheels
My View on Authentic vs Replica wheels

In my opinion, I believe that there are authentic wheels for almost any budget and any application.

[]Robert Sixto

The wheel market is a complex game these days. There is a huge range of quality within it, and seemingly thousands of "brands" to go with it. The name brands are going to be products you can generally trust, knowing that they have a high standard of quality control and good processes. Off brands can vary greatly. Knowing the ways wheels are constructed is critical too, a fully forged wheel is going to be stronger than a flow formed wheel is going to be stronger than a pressure cast, which is stronger than a gravity cast wheel. Find out where in that hierarchy the company's wheels fall. Personally, I wouldn't go for anything less than pressure cast. Wheels from many brands are made in shared plants too, they just badge them to the company's liking. Stuff made in Taiwan is generally going to have better quality control than stuff coming out of mainland China. Education really is key when you start wheel shopping, but off brand wheels can have a very real trade off.

[]Battle Tested

Exactly, and thats why I choose brands that have been in the business for quite some time like Work, Weds, Enkei and now SSR. I want to go with a set of Rays next, but I will have to sell all 12 of my SSR, and Weds to do so.

[]Robert Sixto

It's a tough situation for manufacturers, they have to constantly worry about designs being copied, prices being undercut, but still trying to innovate and maintain a higher standard. I haven't been able to bring myself to go the rep route since a set of Rota's back in the day. Now if I just want something less expensive, I will just shop used name brand. Sometimes they can be had for about what a new set of reps cost, and with a little work you can make them like new again.

[]Battle Tested

Thats the thing man, I think people just want to buy something that looks like what they want, but they dont care about where it came from or how it was made, and then if you present the real thing at the same price, they dont want to put in the work to make something new again. Which goes into how people want to build a car so quickly and cut corners to make events and be apart of a scene that isnt going anywhere.

[]Hayden Baker

I'll never buy a wheel like the TE37 or similar type wheel. Unless you're a pro race team or super rich, it's a waste of money. The market now has a huge selection of flow formed wheels that are almost as strong which is way stronger than 99% of people need. Konig is really stepping up their game and those wheels are $800 for a set of 18x10.5 inch wheels

[]Battle Tested

I mean that’s cool and all however, you don’t have to be super rich or on a pro race team to run a forged wheel. You just have to be smart about where you buy your wheels and what models from whatever brand you want fits into your budget. I’m not super rich by any means but I didn’t get 12 three piece wheels just handed to me either.
Konig is a great company for budget quality authentic wheels as well as Enkei. People are gonna buy what’s in their budget but, there’s is an unquestionable quality differs between a Rays 57DR and a Varrrstoen ES2.

[]Hayden Baker

No one will ever convince me they're worth the money over an Enkei wheel. To me it's just a waste. Unless your car cost 100,000 or more, it doesn't need a $3,600 set of rays on it.

[]Battle Tested

A set of Rays 57CR or 57DR (exclusive to the US) can be had for around $1300 dollars. There are even some Enkei models that reach into that price range as well. Quality and design are never a waste, especially if you want to build something noteworthy in my opinion. Not to say that you can’t build anything noteworthy on Enkeis that is. However, a lot of research and development from the Volk TE37 has followed down to the Rays Gramlights and the Rays 57 series of wheels. Not to mention that these wheels hold their value more than an Enkei wheel would and in some cases can gain value depending on what model you buy at a certain time. But as always, people will buy what they say they can afford, I will continue to buy multi piece wheels until I feel the want to buy single piece wheels.

[]Tom Armstrong

I agree that you get what you pay for, and that more expensive "forged" wheels are of higher quality. But spending $300 on a BBS flow formed wheel is not smarter than spending $120 on a Konig flow formed wheel. Like you said, If you have the money to spend more and thats what you want then go for it. But lets not forget that a lot of parts can become "consumables" in racing.

[]Battle Tested

Oh yea I completely get that. Konig wheels also have original designs and have been a well established brand especially in the last couple years. But if I buy a BBS flow formed wheel, odds are that I’m buying it because of the design. I’m mainly addressing the difference between say an RPF1 and a MST Suzuka. Both wheels are the same design, but one is manufactured completely different than the other and one will certainly outlast the other. I believe if you buy something of quality once, you will be doing yourself a favor, rather than buying something cheap. Though Racing can have consumables, as someone that drifts I rely on multi piece wheels because of the modularity of the wheels. From a show car perspective, I think that if you want to make something noteworthy you should be buying things that exemplify exactly that. But everyone’s views will be different. And as always people will buy what they can afford

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