SPECS
Horsepower
315 HP
Torque
330 LB-FT
Curb Weight
3000 LB
Drivetrain
All Wheel Drive
Engine Size
2 L
Transmission Type
Manual
MPG (City/Highway)
20 MPG
VEHICLE STORY

Why This One?   This car used to belong to a close friend of mine and was a long term project of his.   He wanted a 1G AWD that he he could take out to the road and autocross course, with less of a emphasis on straight line (drag) racing.   With this goal in mind, he began to build the car up.   After a few years, he lost interest in the project and migrated to Miatas.  This car sat for many years before he mentioned early in 2017 that he was going to start parting it out.   I had just gotten the 1G DSM "bug" back in my system and hated seeing a good car get parted out, so we struck a deal.  He unloaded his automotive "albatross" on me and I was back in the 4G63/DSM game. I've done enough work on it, and changed more than a few things I didn't like to be able to safely say, this is now MY car. Modifications:   A lot of the mods were performed by the previous owner, but with more of a mindset for a more track oriented car that could turn.  I wanted a street car that could possibly be driven on a track while he leaned more towards a track car that was just marginally "street legal."   What mods did I have to deal with? *SIGH*   No Front Crash Beam. No Factory Seatbelts. All 5 Point Harnesses, All The Time. Race Seats. Cool to have, but not very comfortable. Gutted the Heater Ducting, Blower Motor and Heater Core from under the dash. Left the stereo and speakers in though.   Gauges mounted where the now useless A/C control knobs were and a few more things. So, of course, some changes were made by me to make it more street friendly. Describe the modifications you've made. The car was fairly modified for track use before I got it so a lot of the recent work has been restoring it for street use and maintenance.   I removed the track only 3 inch thick radiator and installed a Mishimoto 2 core aluminum Radiator and cooling fans with electronic controller.   It was literally one of 3 units made for a few guys who roadraced DSM's in the Dallas area 10 years ago, but it got in the way of EVERYTHING in the engine bay.   I also removed the 5 point harnesses and the Corbeau race seats for a set of factory cloth seats and rewired and reinstalled the factory seatbelts. Harnesses and race seats are cool...but not everyday. Swapped out the cracked dash for a dash in better shape.   Reinstalled rear seats and trim panels for street use. Trimmed and modified front bumper support to clear the intercooler core. Reinstalled the gutted heater ducting blower motor, heater core and associated er hoses under dash and in the engine bay.   The latest mod was installation of a 90 Air/Oil Cooler oil filter housing and a large B&M oil Cooler with -8AN lines and fittings.  The 91+ Water/Oil cooler assembly on the Oil Filter Housing is notoriously inefficient and a potential source for coolant contamination of the oil supply due to a crushed oil cooler assembly.     How did you go about selecting the specific parts for this build? Any installation tips to share?   The nice thing about DSM's is they've been around for forever.  These cars have literally been used for just about everything.     Daily Drivers, Drag Racing, Autocross, Road Racing, Rally Racing, Dirt Track Racing and on and on. If it can be done on 4 wheels, chances are a DSM has done it.   With that in mind, there are numerous online resources dedicated to modifying, tweaking and maintaining these cars.   If you want more power, there are several sites that can detail staged upgrade paths to increase power economically and safely.    The same goes for suspension, handling, and other areas.   Google is your friend, along with other sites like DSMTuners or DSMTalk.  VFAQ.com is a treasure trove of old school DSM information.  There is more than enough information out there, you just have to find it.   .As for install tips...read the manual.  Not a Chiltons or a Haynes manual, but the Factory Service Manual.  These cars are not that hard to work on and have been around long enough that most shops will have some idea of what they're dealing with.  If you have to watch a YouTube video to see how someone else did it or to see how NOT to do something.   Take your time.  Read the manual and don't buy crappy parts. What’s been the biggest challenge with this build?   Parts availability, mostly.  OEM Factory parts, especially Talon specific stuff like emblems, bumper covers, trim pieces and other things.   You're going to need to develop a hoarder/pack rat mentality.  If you find a stash of parts, snag what you can because the days of seeing these things in the junkyard often, are over.   Performance parts for the 4G63 are still out there, but performance parts specifically for the 1G DSM are getting hard to find.  What are you planning next?   Paint and bodywork.  The car was left outside for many years and it looks it.  I want it cleaned up and looking good inside and out.   I plan on continuing to modify the car with some additional parts that will help it go faster, turn better and stop before I run into something.    It's going to continue being a fun street car that occasionally visits the track and gets driven in anger. Since I have a 98 Talon AWD as well, this car may see some of that " Because Racecar" stuff going back onto it,  

Ed's posts
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I've picked up a few more things to upgrade the suspension on my 93 Eagle Talon TSi/AWD. In addition to the Koni Yellow Adjustable Sport inserts for the front shocks, I picked up a set of 3SX Racing Adjustable Rear Camber arms and a Jay Racing Active Rear Toe Elimination Kit. The 3SX Rear Camber arms are a kit composed of AFCO tubular arms, some stainless steel bushings, a ball joint and a teflon lined Heim end. It replaces the upper

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Be careful out there, when installing old parts. I picked up a really clean set of taillights for my 93 Talon from a guy in OKC parting out his car. These have been stored until I felt like installing them, and I decided to throw them on the car since I had the time. The set that's currently on the car are serviceable, but scratched and faded. I've done this a million times before and I never

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[]Jake Johnson

When I was rebuilding the engine in the Corvette (the first time), I installed the clutch and torqued down the pressure plate, only to realize that the throwout bearing wasn't seated correctly. So I went to take the assembly apart, and when I did, the clutch disc slipped between the flywheel and pressure plate, bounced off my garage floor and cracked. The rage was unreal.

[]Ed Dobrzyn

I can imagine the rage, especially when all you were doing was trying to correct an issue. Been there, done that. Heh...

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